International Journal of Medical and Health Research

International Journal of Medical and Health Research


International Journal of Medical and Health Research
International Journal of Medical and Health Research
Vol. 6, Issue 1 (2020)

Lumbosacral transitional vertebra: Prevalence in patients with low back pain


Dr. Chandan Kumar, Dr. Ravi Kumar

Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae (LSTV) is the most common congenital anomaly of the lumbosacral spine and may manifest either as a sacral assimilation of the fifth lumbar vertebrae (sascralisation) or separation of the first sacral vertebrae into the lumbar spine (lumbarisation). The prevalence of LSTV is said to vary between 4% and 30% in various studies. Low back pain is quite common problem affecting about 80% of the population in their lifetime. The relationship between LSTV and low back pain has been controversial since its first description by Bertolotti in 1917. It is a prospective observational study carried out in department of orthopaedics and Radio-Diagnosis in Aiims Patna, bihar from july 2018 to july 2019. Patients presenting to orthopaedic OPD with low back pain for at least 2 weeks and patients presenting with non-orthopaedic problem were included and divided into two groups Group A and Group B respectively. Out of 340 cases with back pain (200 males and 140 females) and among 300 control group without back pain (180 males and 120 females) were evaluated with mean age 31.1 years in case and 32.53 years in control group. The Incidence of LSTV in Group A (patients with low back pain) and Group B (control) was 18.52% and 12.3% respectively. Incidence of LSTV in patients with low back pain was found to be statistically higher than in patients without low back pain (p value<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between men and women who had LSTV in both study group (p value for both the group was >0.05). Incidence of sacralisation in Group A and Group B was 73.01% and 78.37% and that of lumbarisation was 26.98% and 21.62% respectively. Incidence of sacralisation and lumbarisation was not statistically significant in both sexes (p value for both the Group was >0.05). Incidence of lumbarisation was statistically higher in women in Group B (p value <0.05). LSTV Type II was most common type of LSTV. Prevalence of LSTV was found to be higher in patients with low back pain than in patients without back pain. This shows significant correlation between LSTV and low back pain.
Pages : 202-207